Bengali Khejur Gurer Payesh Recipe

Gluten Free

This khejur gurer payesh is somewhat of a winter delicacy, especially made during the Sankranti when the date palm jaggery or patali is available in the markets. And with patali comes a wide range of Bengali sweets and desserts which makes every Bengali await for the entire year! So, around the 15th of January, you will see most Bengalis making a variety of delicacies using the season’s fresh khejur gur, including this chaler payesh.

In this blog post, we will take you through the step-by-step process of preparing this divine dessert right in your kitchen. From selecting the finest ingredients to achieving the perfect creamy consistency, we have got you covered.

Traditional Bengali Khejur Gur diye Payesh

Khejur Gur or Nolen Gur – A Sweet Tradition Rooted in History

In the culinary world of Bengali cuisine, one ingredient reigns supreme when it comes to adding natural sweetness and unique flavors to traditional recipes – Khejur Gur or Nolen Gur, also known as date palm jaggery. This exquisite sweetener holds a significant place in Bengali culture and has a fascinating history that stretches back centuries.

Every year, when winter comes, there comes the liquid gold for every Bengali, the sweet nectar of the Date Palm tree known as Nolen Gur. In rural Bengal, every morning the sap would be collected by the expert people who would climb up the lofty palm trees, by making incisions in the tree trunks.

The extracted sap is carefully boiled in large iron or copper vessels, allowing the moisture to evaporate. As the sap reduces, it gradually transforms into a rich, dark brown, viscous syrup, imparting a distinct caramel-like aroma and robust flavor.

In Bengali households, this khejur gur finds its way into an array of traditional desserts, such as Khejur Gurer Payesh (rice pudding), Sandesh (milk-based sweet), and Pithe (rice cakes). The natural sweetness and unique flavor profile of Khejur Gur elevate these delicacies to new heights, leaving a lasting impression on the taste buds.

Now, I know there are millions of payesh recipes on the internet. But I will tell you how to avoid the curdled payesh recipe which nobody likes. Honestly, I have had my share of disasters, and it was one of my office colleagues who taught me the tricks for this absolute creamy and luscious payesh recipe.

Khejur Gur vs Nolen Gur Vs Patali

Nolen Gur or Khejur Gur are the same, that is, the sweet liquid collected from the sap of Date Palm tree. Since it has higher moisture content, it has much lesser shelf life. Once this liquid is boiled and reduced, it is poured into moulds. Once they cool down completely they turn hard and can be kept for next couple of months for later use. If refrigerated, they even remain fresh for almost a year.

How to make Bengali Khejur Gurer Payesh – Ingredients list

  • Khejur Gur or Date Palm Jaggery
  • Gobindobhog Rice – Bengali short-grained rice is known for its distinctive flavor
  • Full fat Milk
  • Bay Leaf
  • Ghee

Step-by-step instructions for this authentic Nolen Gurer Payesh

  1. Take the heavy bottom non-stick pan and pour the milk into it. Drop in the bay leaf. Turn on the heat and let this come to a boil.
  2. Meanwhile, wash the rice nicely and keep it aside. Once the milk comes to a rolling boil, add the rice and the ghee. Now, keep stirring until the milk thickens and the rice has cooked to its center.
  3. Now, turn off the heat and remove the pan from the stovetop. Add the date palm jaggery or khejur gur and give everything a gentle stir. Cover it with the lid and let it sit for a while.
  4. After 10-15 minutes, give the payesh another stir. The patali would have melted, giving it an amber color. Also, as it cools down the payesh will thicken.
  5. Serve with a topping of shaved patali along with some chopped nuts and raisins.

The amount of date palm jaggery that I have mentioned here will give you a payesh with mild sweetness, just as we prefer it. However, if you want to have it sweeter then add more khejur gur. You will not know the resultant sweetness until the jaggery has melted down completely, so wait till it does. And by that time if you find the payesh too cold to melt any more jaggery then, either melt the jaggery before adding it to the payesh. Or, add the jaggery and microwave the payesh to melt the gur. DO NOT BOIL THE PAYESH AFTER ADDING JAGGERY. It will curdle otherwise.

khejur gur patalir chaler payesh

Tips & tricks on how to make Khejur Gurer Payesh

  1. Quality of Rice – One thing that makes a payesh recipe stand out is the rice in use. Stick with Gobindobhog Chal, ALWAYS. There is no substitute for this. Its aroma is unparalleled. In my opinion, no basmati rice can ever be a match to our very good ‘ol gobindobhog chal.
  2. Cow Milk only please – That pale texture, its very own sweetness, and just the right amount of fat gives you the best payesh recipe. If you have to, then use Full Cream Milk, but no Toned Milk please, or Reduced Fat Milk. 
  3. Crush the Khejur GurOnce crushed they melt quickly and evenly. Thus distributing the sweetness evenly throughout the payesh.
  4. Never boil after adding the gur – NEVER. EVER..always remember this. Otherwise, you will be left with a curdled mess instead of a creamy payesh. Always turn off the heat and then add the gur. Let it melt on its own in the residual heat of the payesh. Just give it an occasional stir to mix it up uniformly.   

For this recipe of payesh, I used my previous year’s stock of patali gur that I got from Gariahat Market in Kolkata. Whenever I visit Kolkata in the winter, I make sure to buy some khejur gur patali as well as, some gobindobhog chal. I keep both these things in my fridge and they stay quite well in air-tight containers. In Delhi, Chittaranjan Park also offers good quality Bengali products. 

This payesh recipe is a small batch recipe, so you can multiply the ingredients for a bigger batch. If you are like me and like having some homemade dessert in the fridge for just-in-case-hungers, make a big batch of it and refrigerate it. It tastes amazing even when served chilled, topped with some shavings of jaggery. 

If you are looking for a few more traditional Bengali dessert recipes, here are a few from my Blog

Have you tried this recipe? I would love to hear about it.
Tag me on Instagram @priyankabhattacharya.sa or Facebook @hashdiaries and I will share it further.

I have over 300+ Bengali Recipes on my Blog which offers a wide variety of dishes. Starting from classic and traditional Bengali Ranna Recipes to contemporary Bengali dishes that are more suited to modern-day hectic lifestyles.

Bengali Nolen Gurer Payesh Recipe
Prep Time
15 mins
Cook Time
45 mins
Total Time
1 hr
 

This nolen gur or khejur gurer payesh is somewhat a winter delicacy, especially made during the Sankranti when the date palm jaggery is available in the markets. So, around 15th of January, you will see most Bengalis making a variety of delicacies using the season's fresh khejur gur, including this chaler payesh.

Course: Dessert
Cuisine: Bengali
Diet: Hindu
Keyword: Bengali Food, Bengali Sweets Recipes, Dessert Recipes, Gluten Free Recipes, Indian Dessert Recipe, Indian Sweets Recipes, Jaggery Recipes, Mithai Recipes, Rice Dishes
Servings: 4 People
Ingredients
  • 1 litre Full-fat Cow's Milk
  • 2 tbsp Gobindobhog Rice Bengali short grained rice
  • ¼ cup Khejur Gur Patali coarsely crushed
  • 1 Bay Leaf
  • 1 tbsp Cow Milk Ghee
Instructions
  1. Take the heavy bottom non-stick pan and pour the milk in it.

  2. Drop in the bay leaf. Turn on the heat and let this come to a boil.

  3. Meanwhile, wash the rice nicely and keep it aside. Once the milk comes to a rolling boil, add the rice and the ghee. Now, keep stirring until the milk thickens and the rice has cooked till its centre.

  4. Now, turn off the heat and remove the pan from the stove top. Add the crushed date palm jaggery or patali and give everything a gentle stir. Cover with the lid and let it sit for a while.

  5. After 10-15 minutes, give the payesh another stir. The patali would have melted, giving it an amber colour. Also, as it cools down the payesh will thicken.

  6. Serve with a topping of shaved patali or chopped nuts and raisins.

Recipe Video

Recipe Notes

The amount of patali I have mentioned will give you a payesh with mild sweetness, just as we prefer it. However, if you want to have it sweeter then add more of the patali.

You will not know the resultant sweetness until the jaggery has melted down completely, so wait till it does. And by that time if you find the payesh too cold to melt any more jaggery then, either melt the jaggery before adding it to the payesh. Or, add the jaggery and microwave the payesh to melt the gur.

DO NOT BOIL THE PAYESH AFTER ADDING JAGGERY. It will curdle otherwise.

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Indian Food Blogger Priyanka Bhattacharya

Hi! I’m Priyanka!

A passionate home cook and food lover who loves nothing more than sharing my favourite recipes with the world.

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